NORTH EAST WOLVERHAMPTON ACADEMY

Excellence through Endeavour

English

  • Head of subject: Miss G Whitehouse
  • Year groups taught: 7 to 13

Introduction

Welcome to English; a subject that is not only creative, exciting and inspiring, but one that offers an essential gateway to a successful and fulfilling future. Within the department, we pride ourselves on our creative approach to the subject alongside our sharp focus on literacy, providing pupils with a comprehensive and valuable skillset. As part of the academy’s Pledge, during your child’s time at the academy, they will also experience a range of enrichment activities including: theatre visits, workshops and visits to sites of historical interest.

Why is this subject important?

English is an essential subject for many reasons. Not only will it equip your son/ daughter to read fluently and to write with accuracy and skill, English will also enable them to think critically and independently, to work effectively with others and to work successfully as an independent learner. Ultimately, English allows individuals to better engage with the world around us.

Resources to highlight

The faculty boasts an excellent range of resources. Alongside a dedicated IT and state of the art Apple Mac media facility, we also have the latest Apple I-pads to facilitate the students’ studies. The faculty also prides itself on enrichment opportunities both within and outside lessons, regularly inviting the Young Shakespeare Company to perform to students and arranging various trips to theatres and cinemas.

Key stage 3

Introduction

The English department offers a lively, engaging and creative curriculum at key stage 3. Pupils approach a wide range of fiction and non-fiction in creative and unique ways. We use a variety of texts from different genres, encouraging the students to have a broad and balanced view of the subject. This includes a drama-based approach to Shakespeare in Year 7 which enables pupils to appreciate the plays in performance. The concept behind the English KS3 curriculum is that students will answer a series of ‘bigger questions’ about the importance of English through their studies.

We also place a great emphasis on enrichment: in KS3 students can expect to see several plays in performance, work with theatre groups, visit Shakespeare’s birthplace and take part in other personalised enrichment opportunities such as BBC School report and author visits.

Year 7

Structure of course
Students have four 60 minute lessons per week in English; some students who are identified as Catch Up premium will receive an additional weekly English lesson

Topics covered

  • What’s your story? Students will study a collection of Roald Dahl’s texts as well as analysing a range of biographies and autobiographies.
  • What a fantastical world do we live in? Students will gain an understanding of the fantasy genre whilst studying a range of seminal texts from the genre across a vast historical period. Students should expect to study the woks of Tolkien, Rowling and Carrol.
  • Why should I stand up for Shakespeare? An introduction to how Shakespeare’s plays have been adapted to suit 21st Century audiences

Students are assessed by
An initial baseline assessment to give their teacher a clear starting point then 2 key assessment pieces submitted per term with either a reading, writing or speaking and listening focus. All assessment will be interlinked to the new GCSE criteria in order to prepare students on a five year journey towards linear assessment. Students will sit two GCSE style examinations at the end of the academic year.

Year 8

Structure of lessons
Students have four 60 minute lessons per week in English; some students who are identified as Catch Up premium will receive an additional weekly English lesson

Topics covered

  • Is America the Land of the Free? A study of Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men and how historical events of the time have influenced the text. Students should also expect to study extracts from other key American texts.
  • What Can I Learn About the World Through Writing? Students will study of range of travel writing and texts from other cultures as well as exploring the how non-fiction texts are produced in a range of mediums and producing their own piece of travel writing.
  • Why Do We Love Animals? Students will study a range of texts that explores the human relationship with animals, including an in-depth study of the works of Rudyard Kipling. In addition to this students will explore a range of non-fiction texts looking at animal rights campaign materials.

Students are assessed by
Two key assessment pieces submitted per term with either a reading, writing or speaking and listening focus. All assessment will be interlinked to the new GCSE criteria in order to prepare students on a five year journey towards linear assessment. Students will sit two GCSE style examinations at the end of the academic year.

Key stage 4

Introduction

Our key stage 4 curriculum is geared towards promoting the creativity and independence of our pupils alongside preparing them for formal GCSE examinations. We make use of cutting edge technology (such as our state of the art Apple Mac suite and Apple IPads) to enhance the learning of our pupils, as well as continuing to provide enrichment opportunities to help further engage and enthuse students in their studies. Our belief is that resilient, independent and creative learners are successful learners. To this end, we encourage pupils to take a leading role in their own education and ultimate success. Group work/presentations, independent study and extended homework projects are therefore integral to our pupils’ experience of the subject. The department continues to develop and evolve, achieving the best A*-C results in the Academy’s history in Summer 2013.

Pathway

  • NE: AQA 2 GCSEs-Language and Literature
  • W: AQA 1 GCSE-English and Step Up to English Entry Level qualification. Some W pathway students may also study English Literature

Qualifications

  • AQA GCSE English Language
  • AQA GCSE English Literature

Examining body

  • AQA

The skills and qualities Students need to succeed in this course are

  • The ability to read, analyse and interpret a range of fiction and non-fiction
  • The ability to write accurately for a range of purposes
  • The ability to respond to a text through extended writing
  • The ability to work effectively within a group and present ideas with confidence

What you will study

Year 9
Year 9 will serve as an introduction to the study of English Literature and English Language. Students will begin the academic year with an in-depth study of Susanne Collins’ The Hunger Games. They will then move on to further developing their skills for the English Language examinations; ending the year sitting two full GCSE mock examinations.

Year 10
Students will begin their study of English Literature and English Language GCSEs. At the start of Year 10 teachers will take an assessment objective based route ensuring that students hone the skills required to gain or exceed their end of Key Stage 4 target grades. Students will sit two full mock examinations at key points throughout the year. In the Summer term students will begin their study of GCSE English Literature, starting with the study of Modern Texts (either An Inspector Calls or Never Let Me Go dependent on teaching group) and a collection of poetry.

Year 11
Students will finalise their study of English Literature during the Autumn term when they will study a Shakespeare play (Romeo and Juliet or Macbeth) and a 19th Century Novel (Jekyll and Hyde or Frankenstein). They will then revise all the key materials required for examination for the remaining term prior to their linear GCSE examinations.

Students are assessed by

Year 9
Two key assessment pieces submitted per term with either a reading, writing or speaking and listening focus and an end of year mock examination for GCSE English Language.

Year 10
Internal assessments throughout the year as well as a full mock for GCSE English Language and Paper 1 of GCSE English Literature

Year 11
Formal examinations in English Language and Literature as well as several mock examinations throughout the year.

What might students study after this?

  • English Literature
  • English Language
  • Media Studies
  • Film Studies
  • Journalism
  • Law
  • Creative Writing

Possible careers

  • Teaching
  • Journalism
  • Law
  • Civil Service
  • Film and TV
  • Banking/Accountancy
  • Promotions and Media
  • Publishing
  • Further Study

For more information contact

Mrs L Wilkes.