NORTH EAST WOLVERHAMPTON ACADEMY

Excellence through Endeavour

History

  • Head of Subject: Mrs A Nicklin
  • Year groups taught: Year 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and post-16

Introduction

Just as history has made our world what it is, history can also be part of your future. Learn how history informs the present and prepares for the future.

Why is this subject important?

History is very useful because if employers see a qualification in history then they know some things about you. Employers will know that you have taken on certain key skills such as analysing, thinking creatively and thinking critically. They will also know that you will be able to transfer these skills to all sorts of situations. They know that: you can understand what makes people tick, what motivates them, what they think and feel; you are able to gather information; you are able to look carefully at information and check if it is bias or a piece of propaganda; you can read and interpret graphs, maps and other diagrams; you are able to communicate clearly and have learned to express yourself verbally and on paper.

Key Stage 3

Introduction

Key stage 3 history is all about helping our students gain a sense of identity and how to be subjects of this great country. We start off in 1066 and cover important British, European and World events through to the modern day at the end of Year 8.

Year 7

Structure of course
Currently our students have one and a quarter hours of history a week. Each half term generally introduces a new topic in which to be discovered.

Topics covered

  • The Medieval Realms
  • The making of the United Kingdom (Tudor and Stuart Kings / The English Civil war)

The skills students will learn this year are

  • Using primary and secondary sources of evidence
  • Improving communication and literacy skills
  • How to analyse and present information
  • Historical knowledge

Students are assessed by
End of unit assessments in the form of a formal test.

Year 8

Structure of lessons
Currently our students have one and a quarter hours of history a week. Each half term generally introduces a new topic in which to be discovered.

Topics covered

  • The Slave Trade
  • Empire
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • Victorian Values
  • World War I
  • World War II

The skills students will learn this year are

  • Using primary and secondary sources of evidence
  • Improving communication and literacy skills
  • How to analyse and present information
  • Historical knowledge

Students are assessed by
End of unit assessments in the form of a formal test.

Key Stage 3 2014

Introduction

The new Key Stage 3 curriculum is focused on a thematic chronological approach. We will cover all the main aspects of History but with a new focus on two pivotal key events and a local study.

Year 7

Structure of course
Currently our students have one and a quarter hours of history a week. Each half term generally introduces a new topic in which to be discovered.

Topics covered

  • 1066 and the creation of England
  • Medieval Realms
  • Tudor and Stewart England

The skills students will learn this year are

  • Using primary and secondary sources of evidence
  • Improving communication and literacy skills
  • How to analyse and present information
  • Historical knowledge
  • Chronological understanding
  • Analyse change and continuity

Students are assessed by
Each unit will have an independent assessment to cover the breadth of change and continuity of the topic whilst also containing knowledge and understanding assessments at the end of each unit. There will also be a final ‘GCSE style’ exam at the end of the year.

Year 8

Structure of lessons
Currently our students have one and a quarter hours of history a week. Each half term generally introduces a new topic in which to be discovered.

Topics covered

  • Empire
  • Slavery
  • World War One
  • Interwar Years
  • World War Two
  • Holocaust

The skills students will learn this year are

  • Using primary and secondary sources of evidence
  • Improving communication and literacy skills
  • How to analyse and present information
  • Historical knowledge
  • Chronological understanding
  • Analyse change and continuity

Students are assessed by
Each unit will have an independent assessment to cover the breadth of change and continuity of the topic whilst also containing knowledge and understanding assessments at the end of each unit. There will also be a final ‘GCSE style’ exam at the end of the year.

Key Stage 4

Introduction

Key Stage 4 history focuses America, Britain and Germany in order to cover some of the main countries and topics of the twentieth century. America is all about the swinging twenties and gangsters, Britain covers the highs and lows of the post war era whilst our students tracking the development of Germany after the First World War through to its destruction under Hitler and then the redevelopment of Germany under capitalism and communism resulting in the collapse of the Berlin Wall.

  • Qualifications: GCSE
  • Examining body: WJEC

The skills and qualities Students need to succeed in this course are

Candidates must have a strong work ethic and have a desire to study History. Students are expected to conducted independent work alongside that set in the class and as home work in order to gain the additional knowledge that will allow them to excel. We also need students that are able to construct essays that follow the basic principles of point, evidence, explain and link. Students should be able to construct short introductions that lead the markers into the main body as well as signposting the main arguments. Students should be able to produce detailed and well explained paragraphs that relate back to the questions set and finish with conclusions that sum up their main arguments. We also require students to become adept at analysing sources through their nature, origin, purpose and content. Students should be able to compare and contrast sources through their meanings and messages.

What you will study

  • The USA: A nation of contrasts, 1910-1929 (QAN – 427103),
  • Austerity, Affluence and Discontent in the United Kingdom, 1951-1979 (QAN – 427203),
  • The development of Germany, 1919-1991 (QAN – 437301),
  • Controlled Assessment on either Evacuation and Dunkirk or Jack the Ripper (QAN – 428601)

Year 9
Year 9 will focus on the development of Germany, 1919-1991 as well as the USA: A nation of contrasts, 1910-1929

Year 10
Year 10 will focus on revising Germany and America whilst also covering Austerity, Affluence and Discontent in the United Kingdom, 1951-1979.

Year 11
Year 11 will initially begin with the controlled assessment (until the new GCSE begins) and then the rest of the time will focus on revising all of the topics in preparation for the GCSE exams.

Students are assessed by

Year 9
GCSE style exam questions periodically throughout their lessons with a mock exam at the end of each unit.

Year 10
GCSE style exam questions periodically throughout their lessons with a mock exam at the end of each unit.

Year 11
GCSE exams

Final exam components

Three exams and a controlled assessment all weighted at 25 per cent of the total marks.

What might Students study after this?

The GCSE is perfectly suited to lead onto AS and A Level History. Two of the units studied provide the students with the necessary background information for an AS unit on Life in Nazi Germany, 1933-1945 and also an A2 unit on The Making of Modern Britain, 1951-2007. The GCSE also provide students with the skills required to do a range of other A Levels such as Law, Criminology, Government and Politics, English and the Sciences.

Possible careers

Lawyer, Barrister, Archaeologist, Archivist, Researcher, Teacher, Museum worker, Lecturer, Tour Guide, Civil Service, Intelligence agency, Detective, Police, Insurance, Politics, Journalism, Media, Administration and Charity and Voluntary sectors.

For more information contact

Mrs A Nicklin.